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Beekeeper Zoran Krstic

Every job that you do requires love. So does beekeeping. What is most important is that you get rid of the beginner’s fear of working with bees, and that you are not allergic to their sting. If you get only a swelling, redness and itchiness after a sting, this is just a normal reaction and in time you will become immune to it.

It is best if you have a friend, a mate or a neighbor who is a beekeeper (who almost never refuses to help a novice beekeeper), who would introduce you to the first works on the apiary. Above all, it is desirable that he explains to you how to approach the beehive without fear and what is the procedure during colonies examination (smoking the beehive, opening the outer cover and pulling out the frame with bees).

It is very important that you first choose the type of beehive with which you are going to work, since the variety of beehive types can make the work in the apiary more difficult. Each type of beehive has its advantages and disadvantages, which you will see for yourself once you gain more experience. The choice of a location where you are going to put beehives is also very important. The location has to be sunny; beehives should be directed southeast, sheltered from the wind, close to the water but not soppy.

For the very beginning you need the necessary beekeeping equipment including: a bee veil (a bee suit), a bee knife and a smoker, and later the rest of the beekeeping equipment (a honey extractor, an uncapping fork, an electric wax embedder etc.) It would be desirable that if there is a beekeeping association in your area, you become their member and thus get in touch with useful information from older and more experienced beekeepers.

Cordial greeting and lots of luck in their work to all the young beekeepers.


Comments

David Race (guest)   31 Oct 2013 08:39 AM UTC, United Kingdom
User

Good advise for novice beekeepers. However I have had to do everything myself. My local beekeeping group is an untapped resource of information but they are very clicky and when I ever asked a question, I would be met by a look that implied that I should know that already which would then follow with a tut and walking away. How was I supposed to learn from that. I have had to cultivate my own confidence when working at the hives and also had to gain all my knowledge from the guys who supply my equipment, books and the internet. Its a shame that this has happened as I was lead to believe that people would perhaps help me as we were all trying to run in the same general direction. Well all I have learnt from other bee keepers is that none are prepared to help.


guest (guest)   01 Nov 2013 09:34 PM UTC, United States
User

Ummm..... some people are allergic.It would be a good thing to know, as an epinephrine pen / shot should be available. I am not sure about developing an immunity to bee venom - I think of it more as a "tolerance", enough stings will kill us all. Not to be picky, but it is important. Also, eye protection is the most critical, a sting directly on the eye ball most likely will result in deterioration or loss of vision or blindness in that eye. So Bee Smart!! :)


GJ (guest)   30 Jun 2014 12:09 PM UTC, India
User

I'm am interested individual into this field. Can anyone guide me on the sites and literature available.......also some willing persons. Email on gprr2010@ rediffmail.com . Thanks


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